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Bijar rug

 
Bijar is one of the fine weaves of Iran and carpet weaving in this area has been a traditional occupation for hundreds of years. Throughout their history the weavers of Bijar have used up to three and even five wefts in each row of knots. This is a much heavier carpet than the typical Sanandaj style. They should always be rolled instead of folded before being moved. There are various designs in Bijar carpets.

Some of the dominant designs are as follows: Botteh, Harati, Min ZeII-e-sultan, Golfarang (flower bouquets). The size of Bijar carpets is approximately 1.5 up to 10 square metres. Runners are relatively rare. All the carpets of this area have Ghiordes (Turkish) knots and are thick- piled. The dominant colours in this region are red, blue, indigo, ivory and pink.

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Bijar

Although the small Kurdish town of bijar in the province of Kermanshah has hardly ten thousand inhabitants, the high quality of its carpets has gained it an international reputation. Concern for this reputation for high quality, has led to the clear distinction between the products of the Bijar town workshops and the Tekab-Bijar, which are woven by art Afshari
tribe who are settled in the area.
The characteristic weft technique used in the Bijar area has led to the term ‘Bijar – structure’ to describe the use of a single weft shoot, thick and tautly stretched after every row of knots. The strong tension of the weft pulls the warps into two layers, giving the carpet great rigidity, although if handled carelessly or folded, it will crack and tear. Carpets with a Bijar
structure (other areas to use the Bijar structure) must therefore be rolled for transport (larger pieces may he rolled around a tube).
Sizes: all sizes, especially from about 1 x 1.50 m (3 ft. 3 in. 5 ft.) upwards. Large pieces of over 12 sq. m (130 sq. ft.) are common. Runners are relatively rare.
Colors: ground colors are harmonious, a product of the blending of subtle pattern shades, Dark blue and a strong red predominate; brown and yellow are also used but green is rare. Sonic old bijars are woven with combinations of light and dark blue.
Patterns: medallion designs are common, as are botch, Herati and mina- khani designs in endless repeats often with multiple borders or guard stripes.
Foundation: warps are of cotton or, less frequently, goat’s wool; wefts are cotton and both warp and weft yarns are tightly spun. In old and antique pieces warps and wefts are of wool.
Knots: the weave is in the Turkish knot, medium tine to fine, with knot counts of 1,500-2,500 knots per sq. dm (100-160 per sq. in.). Persian knotted pieces are also found in otherwise similar structures.
Pile: a very dense hard pile, cut medium to high, although old and antique finely woven pieces tend to be clipped lower.
Quality: Bijar carpets are counted among the hest Oriental carpets for everyday use with an extremely tough and rigid handle. Modern Bijar workshop carpets are still of excellent design and construction.

Tekab - Bijar

The novice would find it hard to distinguish this type of bijar carpet, which is woven by an Afshari tribe in the vicinity of the town, front the carpets woven in the bijar workshops. The Tekah-bijar is therefore not a genuine Kurdish article. Nevertheless, it has proved itself to be of reliable quality and, because of its less rigid Structure; it is sometimes preferred to the urban products of Bijar.
Sizes: colors and patterns as for those of bijar.
Foundation: warps and wefts are of cotton. wefts being of rather thin two-ply yarn and not as firmly beaten down against the knots as in urban Bijar carpets. The thin wefts tend to cause curling of the selvages and the sides of the carpet arc sometimes reinforced with strips of cardboard. Wool foundations were used in some old and antique pieces.
Knots: mainly woven in the Turkish knot with knot densities of 1,500-2,500 knots per sq. dm (100-16o per sq. in.)
Pile: the excellent wool — similar to that used for the town carpets — is cut medium high to high, although old and antique pieces may have a flat pile.
Quality: very high, similar to urban Bijar carpets.

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